rural health

Rural Networks Making a Difference in the Opioid Epidemic

We didn’t want to miss sharing this webinar, recorded on National Rural Health Day, which features Karen Madden of the New York State Office of Rural Health, Rebecca Evansky, AHI, and Charlotte Crawford, Lake Plains Community Care Network. The recording showcases how small rural networks are innovating and collaborating with their communities to address the opioid crisis. Hit play to watch it below or click here for direct access.

NYSARH Research Project: Impact of NYS Funding

Casey Edwards conducted an important research project for NYSARH designed to inform and educate decision-makers regarding NYS funding to public health programs which have a direct and significant impact on: Health of people in rural communities Economic health of those communities Social determinants of health Edwards focus during her research was tri-fold–1.) identify and understand the purpose of key New York State health-related funding streams within selected rural communities, 2.) understand and identify the discrete categories of direct, indirect, and induced economic impact of outside funding by looking at selected health and social entities, and 3.) identify and discuss the economic impact of cuts in funding on rural infrastructure and communities, through the use of IMPLAN w...

2018 New York State Rural Health Award Recipients

The 2018 Annual NYSARH Conference, held at Greek Peak September 26th-28th, recognized Dr. Robert Delorme, Dr. Zsuzsa Meszaros of the Rural Academic Partnership, and Karen Madden for their dedication and service to their communities. Once again, we congratulate our 2018 award winners for all of their efforts in raising awareness of rural health issues and for providing excellent rural health programming in New York State. (From left to right, Dr. Robert Delorme, Dr. Zsuzsa Meszaros, and Karen Madden) Dr. Gary Ogden Rural Health Practitioner of the Year Award – Dr. Delorme The New York State Association for Rural Health is pleased to recognize Robert Delorme, MD for his health leadership in Southern Madison and Northern Chenango Counties with the Dr. Gary Ogden Rural Health Practitione...

Improving Cancer Control in Rural Communities

by Robert T. Croyle, PhD Summary: Two new studies, one by NCI researchers and one led by CDC researchers, have found that cancer rates are higher in rural areas than in urban areas. The decrease in cancer death rates in the United States has been uplifting news for the nation. A point of frustration, however, has been the continued ethnic/racial and socioeconomic disparities in cancer outcomes. Two new studies are putting a spotlight on disparities that have received less attention: those in rural communities across the country. The studies — one by NCI researchers (on which I’m a co-author) and one led by researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — found that cancer death rates are higher in rural areas than in urban areas. The CDC study also showed that, although ca...

2017 Member Survey Results

A survey of NYSARH members identified two issues of great importance preserving Prevention Agenda services and sustaining Rural Hospitals. NYSARH members are very concerned about maintaining access to primary care and behavioral health services in rural communities. A key strategy to preserving access is support for recruitment, retention and workforce development programs that focus on rural locations. Rural families have benefited from the expansion of Medicaid in New York as well as access to health insurance made possible by the ACA. The ACA requires that insurers provide adequate coverage for mental health and addiction services. Families in rural communities have been challenged to cope with the opioid crisis. Finally, we cannot forget how closely health is correlated with wealth. We...

What Works? Strategies to Improve Rural Health

The County Health Rankings & Roadmaps program helps communities identify and implement solutions that make it easier for people to be healthy in their neighborhoods, schools, and workplaces.

What Works? Strategies to Improve Rural Health

The County Health Rankings & Roadmaps program helps communities identify and implement solutions that make it easier for people to be healthy in their neighborhoods, schools, and workplaces. Ranking the health of nearly every county in the nation, the County Health Rankings illustrate what we know when it comes to what is keeping people healthy or making people sick. The Roadmaps show what we can do to create healthier places to live, learn, work, and play. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation collaborates with the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute to bring this program to communities across the nation. Each year, the County Health Rankings bring actionable data to counties across the country, serving as a call to action to improve local health. The 2016 Rankings includ...

New Monday Mile in Oneida opens on National Rural Health Day

The Live Well Committee of the Rural Health Council of Madison County opened the Monday Mile on the Rail Trail, Seneca Street, Oneida on National Rural Health Day, November 17, 2016. The Live Well Committee of the Rural Health Council of Madison County, (www.mcruralhealthcouncil.org) opened a Monday Mile in Oneida on National Rural Health Day, Thursday, November 17, 2016. The newest Monday Mile starts on the Rail Trail on Seneca Street, next to the Oneida High School. The Live Well Committee met to open the Monday Mile and had a “walking meeting”. Luke Griff, the Director of the Oneida City Recreation program educated committee members about the Rail Trail in the City of Oneida. What is a “Monday Mile”? It’s a fun way to get in your daily exercise and helps jump start your week in a health...

National Rural Health Day 2016

The New York State Association for Rural Health (NYSARH) is a not-for-profit, non-partisan, grassroots organization working to preserve and improve the health of the citizens in rural New York State.   NYSARH membership includes representatives of all facets of the rural health care industry, as well as individuals and students.   On many different levels, NYSARH serves individuals, consumers, patients, non-profit organizations, government agencies and officials, health care facilities, emergency medical service providers, long-term care organizations, businesses, universities, foundations, associations, and other stakeholders in rural health. Rural communities have unique healthcare needs   Today more than ever, rural communities must address inadequate transportation, limited access to b...

Rural Data for Action

The New England Rural Health RoundTable is a forum for promoting healthy rural communities and solutions to the unique health challenges facing rural New England.  In this month’s Spotlight New England Rural Health RoundTable is pleased to present their recently released Rural Data for Action Report. We are confident that this publication will serve as a valuable tool for community leaders, legislators, health care providers, administrators and others who work to address the complex issues related to improving and enhancing the region’s health care system. The Executive Summary and Full Report are both available for download.

Happy National Rural Health Day!

A special message from the President of the Board of Directors for the New York State Association for Rural Health, Donald Rowe, PhD. About National Rural Health Day Rural communities are wonderful places to live and work, which is why nearly 62 million people – nearly one in five Americans – call them home. These small towns, farming communities and frontier areas are places where neighbors know each other, listen to each other, respect each other and work together to benefit the greater good. They are also some of the best places to start a business and test your “entrepreneurial spirit.” These communities provide the rest of the country with a wealth of services and commodities, and they are the economic engine that has helped the United State become the world economic power it is today...